Major Health Concerns about Diabetes Medications

I have a guest post today from Barb Stephens from Drugwatch.com. Although Barb’s post specifically talks about Type 2 drugs, I believe that is important to know the side effects of any drug you take. With some drugs like Reglan, side effects can be irreversible. Last year when I went to the dentist, I also learned that drugs like Fosamax can stay in your system for even 10 years after you quit taking it. Do the research before you take any drug or supplement and weigh the pros and cons before using it.

Major Health Concerns about Diabetes Medications

Pills

Knowing the harmful side effects of your diabetes medications before they become life-threatening is like predicting your enemies’ next move: You should keep your friends close and your enemies even closer.

Those who have type 2 Diabetes can help to stabilize their blood sugar by taking certain medications. Being aware of major health concerns and risks before you start a new regime of medication will keep you in better control of your overall health.

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Gastroparesis: Is it Really?

StomachI have talked to a few people online that thought they had gastroparesis, but their doctor’s didn’t think that it was necessary to do the testing to confirm that. Diabetes in Control had an article about a study done by the Mayo Clinic that showed only 5% of Type 1s actually get gastroparesis and only 1% of Type 2s. They felt that anytime a diabetic has a stomach issue, gastroparesis is the diagnosis. You can read the full article here.

I know that I have seen much larger percentages. I just did a quick Google search while writing this and saw numbers as high as 55% of diabetics having gastroparesis. The article doesn’t state anything about the population of the people they studied. My feeling about most complications is that those of us that have been diagnosed longer have a greater chance of getting complications because the things we know and do today did not exist back then. If this study has only followed fairly newly diagnosed people (the study did last 10 years) that mostly only ever used the newer insulins and knew to test after meals, then that could explain the lower rate.

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